M5 Photography

Surf Photography-County Line California

It’s been a while since I ventured out to spend a morning shooting surfing. So when my friend Darren said it was going to be a good day to surf…I took his word and went to County Line for a few snaps.

Tech info: Canon 7D w/Sigma 70-200 f/2.8 lens

Click any images for the larger view.

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The Eastern Sierras

I’ve been driving North on Highway 395 and visiting the Eastern Sierras for most of my adult life. Always wanting to stop during the five hour drive to check out all of the little side roads figuring out what they have to offer, I never had in the past. This trip was like the rest, I didn’t stop at all the little roads, but I did stop and try a few new places. I stopped and spent a couple hours at the Manzanar Relocation Center  for the first time…amazing!! Could have spent a whole day there. Also discovered a hard to describe off road trip through Red Rocks and visited the petroglyphs. Went on hikes in Lee Vining and Bishop which I’d never done before…fantastic places too. Oh and got up and close to the Tufa of Mono lake..wow.
Cant wait for next year.

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Sometimes I write…..

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Until recently, our relationship over the last forty years has been very one sided. I’ve probably been more a part of your life than much of your family. I remember when you were just a young boy and you would visit my friends in the desert, riding motorcycles and exploring the endless landscapes. Laughing at your brother when a failed hill climb attempt would put him in a precarious position. Then cheering him after his success at the same climb. Nights in the desert were spent star gazing near the fire after a long day of riding. I listened as your friends explained that those fast moving stars were in fact satellites. Your young mind was blown. I’m guessing some of your best childhood memories were the days and nights spent exploring the desert. I loved that I was able to be a part of it.
I was also with you when your dad took you camping in the mountains. Again I watched your excitement as new paths opened new worlds. Returning to camp after exploring the trees, streams and reporting back any new animals that were spotted that day. You discovered that breakfast cooked on a camping trip is one of the best meals ever. These early trips established much of who you are today. It brought me great joy being a part of it.
As you grew into a teenager, your visits to the desert and mountains became less frequent. There wasn’t less enjoyment in your trips, just the dynamics of your life had changed. You were now driving yourself to these places and I got to spend time with the new friends you would bring along. Soon there would be a wife in your life who you’d share your childhood memories with by taking her to these exciting locations. It’s safe to say there was a bit of jealousy on my part by this time. Adult life it seems would limit our time together.
I had assumed that once you grew into your adult years I wouldn’t see much of you. I’m thankful that I was wrong. A sport that was new to both of us, mountain biking, would bring us closer than ever. The joy you showed on your first mountain bike ride reminded me of your first days on that tiny motorcycle when you were just a boy. Mountain biking would open more new worlds, bring you hours of exploring and a host of new friends who shared the same passion for this new sport. I don’t completely fault you for not spending time caring for me during these early years of pedaling. I don’t know if you realized how much I needed it.
As your years of pedaling moved along. Your sense of adventure in the sport grew. You’d take trips to Mammoth, Moab, Fruita and Sedona. Bringing home more stories than anyone cared to listen to…I was happy for you. Observing your joy in these new areas brought joy to me too. While you were aware of my needs, unfortunately you continued to ignore my plight.

I’d never asked for help. It seemed to me that my need was obvious. As you traveled more, I thought you would become even more aware I needed help. You had read articles in magazines and on websites where others were helping me. They even made a movie about it. Some spending nearly a lifetime caring for me. Yet you didn’t move. I understand you were busy raising a family…investing much needed time with them. I stood by waiting. If you had an hour you would still visit me, but that offer for help was still missing.
I began to assume that all hope was lost. The government didn’t have the budget to invest in me. There were others in your town who did provide some much needed care for me, but more was needed. I don’t know exactly what changed in you, but one day you just showed up. And you brought help. As you and your friends began to care for me I knew that you weren’t pressured into this…but in fact you had changed. You invested time in me. I watched as hours ticked by and your only breaks were to grab some much needed food and water. As you began to pack your belongings after that first day I had so much hope that you actually enjoyed the effort and you would soon return to me. Your expressions that day brought me memories of your early days exploring the desert.
Not long after your first visit, my hope turned to reality and you were back to care for me. Again you were there for hours and you seemed to really enjoy it. You began a pattern of showing up and even brought new friends who seemed excited to help. We’ve spent more time together than we ever have and your work has made a difference. I love where this journey has taken us and look forward to many more years of new adventures.
Your friend always,
The Trail

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General

Is the Camelbak Mule perfect? It might be….

While this post isn’t necessarily photography related, it does include a large part of my life that usually involves my photography..mountain biking… I’ve been mountain biking much longer than I’ve been taking photos and as soon as I could manage to bring a camera with me on rides…I did. The whole idea for this post came to me on a recent ride where I bumped into a friend of mine who happened to be on a trail that intersected with the one I was on. When I rode up to Alan he was in a bit of a jam and said something to the effect of “man you wont believe what happened…I’m screwed…my front brake pads fell out”. I gave him the look of how does that happen and then listened to his story. He’d done a pad replacement and forgot to install the pin that hold the pads in place. He was lucky enough to hear the pads fall out when riding and was able to pick them up, but was missing a very important spring that holds the pads in place. I told him that I thought I had one and the group of guys around us said a collective “no way…who carries an extra spring?”…Guess I did/do. I gave the spring to Alan and he was quickly back in business and continued on his ride. This encounter with Alan was a reminder that I often labeled myself a pack mule as I typically carry a LOT of gear, but usually end up giving it to someone else. Which got me to thinking…I wonder what all the items I carry in my Camelbak looks like laid out on the table?

So a small photo project was born. Once I began laying out all the items I carried, I realized that my current Camelbak carries a LOT of stuff…and its not even close to being at capacity. And the stuff I laid out to photograph was from a spring time ride. I usually carry even more in the winter months. Which got me to thinking this might be the closest thing to a perfect product that I own. I sat for a few minutes and thought If I were to find a fault in this pack what would it be. I came up empty. Now if you are reading this thinking I’m on Camelbak’s payroll (I wish)…I’m not. Or that they kicked me down some free product (Again..I wish)..they didn’t. I’m just a long time user who took a while to realize I had been using a product that was pretty awesome….dare I say perfect?

I’m not going to take the time to list out all the ways that makes the Camelbak Mule perfect…I’ll just say its comfortable, holds everything I need and I still have a couple pockets/compartments that I haven’t had to use….yet.

 

Click the image below for a list of the items I carry in my pack. Don’t judge me for over packing..You might need to borrow my soapy water or Advil one day.

A couple of notes on items in my pack
The Pump (T) I bought at Kmart over 20 years ago. Still works and that there is a solid product. Think it outlived Kmart itself. (NO idea what brand it is..no markings left to ID it)
The Soapy Water (P) helps in tire changes.
Spare Cable (O)..I’ve been carrying one for years, never used myself but have given out at least three over the years.

The contents of my Camelbak Mule NV

The contents of my Camelbak Mule NV

 

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Published on:
April 4, 2017 7:31 pm
Categories:
General

Kristian Atkins Steps Up-Mountain Bike Photoshoot

I’ve had the pleasure of shooting Kristian on his bike a few times in the past year or so…and each time he mentioned “the step up jump” that I needed to check out. If someone with Kristians skill set tells you to check something out, you probably should. Well unless he is suggesting you check it out on your bike. I knew for me he was suggesting I go take photographs at the jump. Once I arrived at the location I understood his eagerness to shoot here. Amazing spot and a MASSIVE step up jump. It’s difficult to explain the speed he was hitting this jump at….other than to say it was FAST..like no brakes coming in from a massive hill fast.

Huge thanks to Kristian for the location suggestion and for being the rider for the day.

Tech info-
Canon 7D
Tokina 12-24 f/4 lens
Strobe-Godex AD600 fired via Godex Remote (My first time using this strobe and remote…so far so good. Very impressed with all the features)

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Mountain bike photography-Spring in SoCal

All of the extra rain this year in Southern California has been a double edged sword…On one side the hills look amazing and you want to go out and shoot…on the other the rain didn’t let up long enough for everything to dry. Eventually everything lined up and I was able to get the riders, the gear and the right location to be able to highlight the great spring conditions.

Technical Details:
Canon 7D
Canon 580 and 430 flash units fired via PocketWizards

Click any image for a larger view.

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Mountain Biking in Moab Utah – Leaving the camera behind

In each of my past five trips to Moab I’ve brought along my big SLR camera and one lens. The added weight on my back seemed a fair trade off for the opportunity to grab great photos. It is a large effort to interrupt your riding flow, hop off your bike, get to the bottom of your Camelbak and shoot some photos, then repeat many times throughout the day. I’ve done this every time and have always come away with a number of photos that I love. This year I brought along the SLR, but decided to leave it behind on our rides. No photos this year? Never…just decided to ride more and shoot with my phone. Did it limit my shooting options? Maybe. Did I ride more this trip? For sure…Did I get some great shots anyway? Yeah I’m pretty happy with what I got.

Equipment used: One Plus x phone

Click images for larger view

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The Book Of Daniel

I recently had a project working with the creative team at my church to come up with ideas that fit along with the book of Daniel. I had a request to capture an image to show that God can meet you anywhere…that you don’t have to go to a certain place or it doesn’t have to be a certain time of day etc.

The image I wanted to capture represents really the opposite of original request and I wanted to show a man who took a ladder to the top of the hillside to get closer to God. Hoping people would see the absurdity of his actions and provoke thought and conversation.

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Published on:
August 22, 2016 7:05 pm
Categories:
General

Mountain bike photography-Riders making it look easy…

Sometimes when you plan a shoot things do go as planned. In my last post I wrote about and posted photos of when things go wrong. When shooting the photos below everything went as planned and I think I had the easy task of the day. The riders were the ones who had to listen to my ideas, give it a try and usually try it a few more times. Was amazing watching Kristian and Travis ride as they made it all look so easy…
Thank you to the riders and of course my voice activated light stand for the day Chris. Couldn’t do any of it with out you guys!

Tech info-
Camera-Canon 7D
Lenses-Tokina 12-24 and Sigma 70-200
Lights-2 Boling Strobes fired via PocketWizards

Click images for larger view…

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Mountain bike photo shoot-When things dont go as planned

In my years of shooting I’ve had things go wrong. Forgetting batteries, forgetting camera settings, or just missing the shot. But I hadn’t had anything go wrong with my subject until a couple weeks ago. I’ve shot photos of Ben in the past and he is an amazing rider. On this day we started off great and got some good shots…until things didn’t line up for Ben and the sequence below happened. I didn’t have the best view of the whole thing as I was looking through my viewfinder on the camera…but I did get the full audio of it all. It’s a sound that will stick with you for a while. I’m thankful we had a few people with us and were able to help Ben walk out of the area where we were shooting. The end result being a broken wrist, four ribs, four vertebrae and a punctured lung. Ben is healing up and i’m sure ready to get back out there.

 

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